Six Ways to Manage your Anxiety (when climbing a mountain)

six ways to manage your anxiety (when climbing a mountain)

by Brooke Warren 

While we learn to understand the physical demands of each climb, it is important address the mental aspects as well.  Here are some things you can do to quell any fear or trepidation you may have about embarking towards a summit.

Six Ways to Manage your Anxiety (when climbing a mountain):

Train

We’ll send you a targeted training plan that is specifically designed to prepare you for your climb. If you’re able to stick to it, you should have the strength and endurance to make it up the mountain. Plus the training will make you feel better and healthier overall!

Bring a friend

Sharing the experience with someone you already know not only helps you feel supported in this new venture, but you’ll create some amazing memories together.

Confide in your guide

Your guides are there to help you safely and enjoyably climb the mountain. If you feel anxious, it’s helpful for them to know. They may be able to subdue your worries by helping you understand the risks and consequences in a realistic way.

Let go of your ego

Separate your identity from the activity. If you align your sense of self worth with your success in the mountains, you may be disappointed. You are still a worthy human no matter how the climb goes. The mountains don’t change based on who you are.

Break it into manageable parts

As with training, you can focus on putting one foot in front of the other, tasks, landmarks, or other smaller goals while ascending a peak. Stacked on top of one another, those goals will lead to an unforgettable experience in the mountains. Your guides will help you focus your energy on each section of the climb while they concentrate on the big picture.

Focus on beauty

The views you get from the flanks or the summit of a peak are amazing, and so are the views from camp. You’ll get to see the stars in sharp relief, strange and interesting patterns in the snow and ice, sunset and sunrise colors, and all kinds of interesting wildlife from marmots to butterflies to colorful wildflowers. Even if you’re stuck in a whiteout the entire time you can delight in the power of mountain weather. Ultimately, exploring the mountains is really about exploring new vistas, internally and externally.

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