Alp 3 hunkers down at 11,000 feet with some wind and snow then clearing skies

 

Hey everyone, Seth here from Alp 3, just checking in. Everyone’s doing great.

We had a little bit of a storm today, some wind and snow. And we decided to stay here and hunker down at 11,000 feet. It has cleared and we’re hoping that weather holds for tomorrow and we’ll make our move up to 14,200 feet on Denali.

Everyone’s anxious to get up there and so looking forward to the upper mountain. Alright, we’ll talk to you tomorrow. Bye.

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