Itinerary

5-Day Rock Climbing Course Itinerary

Day 1

We’ll do a morning gear check and thoroughly evaluate all the equipment we’ll be using then drive to the crag we’ll be climbing at for the remainder of the day. We will introduce climbing commands, belay techniques, basic knots and hitches, and anchor equalization. Students will have a chance to evaluate natural protection placed by the guides and then build their own natural anchors on the ground level. Climbers will have a chance to climb several different climbs allowing them to work on their movement skills.

Day 2

There will be a review of climbing knots and anchor construction first thing in the morning and then the students will construct their own anchors that the class will use for top rope sessions throughout the day. There is a strong emphasis on developing safe belaying and rappelling during this day. Often the guides will set up more challenging climbs at the end of the day for students to test their climbing prowess.

Day 3

The guides try to change crags to develop different climbing techniques. The skill focus on this day is top rope construction, anchor cleaning and rappelling. At this point during the course guides are able to focus on the individual needs of the climbers and place them on routes accordingly. There is often time at the end of the day to focus on special topics depending on the interest of the group.

Day 4

This day is used almost exclusively for multi-pitch climbing. Climbers are guided up one of several excellent 3 pitch routes in the local area. This is often one of the more enjoyable and memorable days for students.

Day 5

Building on the skills from the previous four days, we cover more advanced techniques such as the mechanics of lead climbing, belaying from above, lowering a climber, mock leading and basic rock rescue skills which include: ascending/descending a fixed line and escaping the belay. Drive back to Seattle.

Excellent!  Small class and individual attention from a real pro, can’t be beat.  Excellent Guide, great focus on safety, much was learned.  Far better training than I have received from other outdoor organizations.

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