Manaslu

Manaslu, the 8th Highest Mountain on Earth

Manalsu, standing at 26,781 feet in the heart of the Nepalese Himalayas, is one of the world’s premier 8000 meter peaks. It is unique among the Himalayan giants in that an expedition to its summit is an achievable undertaking for ambitious intermediate climbers, making it the perfect entrance into the world of high-altitude Himalayan climbing. Manaslu is an excellent stepping stone towards Mount Everest, along with being a remarkable climb in its own right.

While the challenge of high-altitude climbing cannot be underestimated, the technical nature of the ascent is moderate. Our route is composed of snow slopes with short sections of ice and rock scrambling, using occasional fixed ropes for speed and safety. We climb in classic Himalayan expedition style, employing Sherpa who assist with load carrying and camp preparation. The assistance of expert Sherpa, many of whom have guided with us on Mount Everest, greatly increases our chances of success. We move up and down the mountain a series of times while establishing camps and acclimating to the extreme altitude. Supplemental oxygen is used for the summit attempt and while sleeping at High Camp. We build in extra days in our itinerary for inclement weather and slow acclimatization. The relatively short duration of the climb adds to the attraction of this tremendous ascent.

This is a fully guided ascent, led by Alpine Ascents guides who climb the mountain with you. We are one of few outfitters offering this comprehensive type of support, and as a result we have a high success rate and an outstanding safety record. It is worth noting that most outfitters merely offer a supported trek, where a single guide facilitates the logistics but does not act as a guide during the ascent.

This year’s climb will be led by legendary Ben Jones, our Mount Everest Lead Guide.

Alpine Ascents Success on Himalayan Peaks

Alpine Ascents has been a mainstay of Himalayan climbing since 1992. Our reputation in the Himalayas is superb and includes 301 summits of Everest to date and 83 Cho Oyu summits to date. In addition to our annual Everest climb, Alpine Ascents has led successful climbs of Lhotse, Shishapangma, Baruntse, and Island Peak.

As on Everest we offer one style of trip— a fully guided expedition with a low climber-to-guide ratio. This style has led to our historically high summit success rate, an excellent safety record, and extremely satisfied climbers.

A Brief Overview of Sherpa Life

Often inseparable from mountaineering, the Sherpas of Nepal inhabit much of the lower portion of the Himalayas known as the Solu-Khumbu or Khumbu. While their reputation as climbers is nothing short of historic, local Buddhist, animist, and cultural traditions have equally nurtured and impacted a fascinating relationship with Westerners and Western thought.

Sherpas became prominent to the West when British mountaineers began to set their sights on conquering Himalayan peaks. With the first Mt. Everest expedition in 1921, the skill, expertise, honesty, and dedication of Sherpas as guides and partners became an integral part of Himalayan climbing. The affinity of outsiders for Sherpa/Buddhist civilization has blossomed into an ever-increasing sharing, understanding, and friendship between cultures.

Prior to British expeditions, Sherpas revered the great mountains of the region as dwelling places of gods and goddesses, to which the thought of climbing was considered blasphemous. (“Chomolungma,” the Tibetan name for Everest, is the residence of Miyo Lungsungama, the goddess of humanity and prosperity.) Sherpas traditionally worked as traders, farmers, and religious folk. Along with these ancestral roles, leading climbs and treks has recently become a mainstay of the Sherpa economy.

“Sherpa” refers both to a tribal group and a job capacity as porter, climber, or trek leader. The term “Sherpa” means Easterner, referring to their origins in Eastern Tibet. The migrations of this Tibetan culture began sometime in the early 1400’s. Today, the Sherpa population in the Khumbu is about 5,000, with a total of roughly 35,000 living in Nepal.

SHERPAS ON EVEREST

The first notable and successful Everest climbing Sherpa was Tenzing Norgay. In 1952, Norgay accompanied Raymond Lambert to within 800 vertical feet of the still-unclimbed Mt. Everest. A year later, Norgay was asked to join the British team led by Col. John Hunt, which successfully summited Everest following the same route as Norgay and Lambert. Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary were the first climbers to reach the summit. By the mid 1980’s, Sherpas had summited Everest many more times than Westerners. Ang Rita Sherpa, the most well-known climbing Sherpa, had amassed seven summits of Everest by 1995. In 1993, Pasang Lhamu Sherpa became the first Sherpa woman to summit Everest.

THE NAME KHUMBU

The name Khumbu comes from its guardian deity Khumbila Tetsan Gelbu. The literal translation is “Khumbu country god.” The teachings of Sherpa Buddhism talk of a spiritual understanding between all beings. This is probably why the level of hospitality and acceptance of Westerners comes naturally to the Sherpa. It should, however be mentioned, that Tibetans are also considered fierce warriors.

—Gordon Janow, Alpine Ascents Program Director

Reading List

This is a highly recommended shortlist and we would be happy to pass on a longer reading list for those interested. These links will bounce to Amazon.com with reviews.

High Himalaya
by Art Wolfe, Peter Potterfield, Norbu Tenzing Norgay, Mountaineers Books
Everest; The Mountaineers Anthology Series
Foreward by Tom Hornbein, Peter Potterfield editor, Mountaineers Books
Everest
by Walt Unsworth, Mountaineers Books
Classic Hikes of the World
Peter Potterfield, W.W. Norton pub.
Fragile Edge : Loss on Everest
by Maria Coffey, Harbour Pub Co.
Coronation Everest
by Jan Morris, Burford Books
Everest : The West Ridge
by Thomas F. Hornbein, Mountaineers Books
Eric Shipton: Everest & Beyond
by Edmund Hillary, Peter M.D. Steele, Mountaineers Books
The Snow Leopard (Penguin Nature Classics)
by Peter Matthiessen, Penguin USA (paper)
Trekking in Nepal : A Traveler's Guide
by Stephen Bezruchka, Mountaineers Books

Thoroughly enjoyed the course. Felt like it was top quality and really well done. Guides were extremely knowledgeable and conveyed the information in a clear and concise manner. I do feel prepared to use the skills in future climbs with some practice on my part.

ALPINE ASCENTS BLOG

  • Revealed: Alpine Ascents New Guide Training

    by Kate Keith-Simms After building up your climbing resume, assembling the required certifications, and submitting your application materials to the Alpine Ascents Guide Manager, you finally receive that long awaited email… Congratulations! After making a very favorable impression during the interview process in addition to excellent references and an impressive climbing resume, we are happy […]

  • Dear Alpine: Internships?

    Hey Alpine, My heart is in the mountains. Ever since I watched the sun rise over the Easton Glacier on my 6-day course this summer, I’ve dreamed of kicking my REI vest and nametag to the curb and picking up a rope and crampons. It’s time for an outdoor office. Other than my guided climb […]

  • 2022 Aconcagua Webinar

    If your 2022 winter plans include climbing the Stone Sentinel, check out the webinar we hosted on October 4th.  Lead Aconcagua Guide, Rachel Molstad, outlined both climbing routes and what to expect on the expedition.   Our Gear Manager, Ciara Sampaio, walked us through gear considerations along with helpful information on porters, money, and pre-trip logistics.  […]

Partners & Accreditations

Alpine Ascents International is an authorized mountain guide service of Denali National Park and Preserve and Mount Rainier National Park.
© Copyright 2022 All Rights Reserved. Alpine Ascents International