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Why Climb With Us

Cho Oyu Summmit Success

Totally enjoyed the expedition. The logistics and process were well thought out and easy to deal with. It was a pleasure to follow Ben and Lakpa – easy to be part of the team. Very patient and happy to help me. All the staff were fabulous. Pretty hard to think of a way to improve it – really happy with each aspect of the trip. – 2016 Cho Oyu climber.

Tibet closed in 2017 – No expeditions permitted.

Our reputation for leading climbs in the Himalayas is superb and includes summits of Cho Oyu, Ama Dablam and Pumori. We’ve led more than a dozen successful guided climbs of Mt. Everest, with over 250 climbers reaching the summit of the world’s highest peak. Some of our past Cho Oyu climbs have had 100% summit success.

Previous Cho Oyu climbing expeditions by Alpine Ascents have placed 83 members on the summit!
Summary of recent climbs:

  • 2016: Lakpa Rita Sherpa and Ben Jones led our team of six to the summit.
  • 2014: Lakpa Rita Sherpa and Ben Jones led our team of nine to the summit.
  • 2013: Lakpa Rita Sherpa and Ben Jones led nine to the summit. Our Sherpa team took the lead in fixing the route.
  • 2011: Brien Sheedy and Lakpa Rita Sherpa led our team to the summit. Most expeditions left well before Alpine Ascents and without a summit attempt, but our team diligently hung in there and reached the summit on October 4, 2011.
  • 2009: Another outstanding year with Michael Horst and Lakpa Rita Sherpa leading climbers to the summit. This season, Alpine Ascents had an eight-climber team, with six climbers reaching the summit (two left early in the expedition).

Some of the keys to our continued success:

Local Guides

Unlike many outfitters, we use our Nepali (Sherpa) guides to assist with the expedition. This can result in a much higher quality expedition.

Climber-to-Guide Ratio

Typically we operate at a 4:1 climber-to-guide ratio on this expedition.

Sherpas

We utilize the Alpine Ascents Himalayan Sherpa Team during the climb.

Slow acclimatization schedule

We believe there is no point in moving to a higher elevation unless climbers feel good where they are. Given this, we take the time needed early in the trip to establish a sound base of acclimatization.

Sherpa Leadership

We employ the most experienced climbing Sherpa on the mountain (most with between 10 and 17 summits of Everest). These climbing Sherpa are able to move our gear and supplies up and down the mountain so you don’t have to. They are also great friends and comrades on the mountain. In the Himalayas, our Sherpa team most often takes the lead in fixing the climbing routes for summit day and during the climb.

Base Camp

A permanent Base Camp is established for the duration of the expedition.

Communication

All guides are equipped with radios for communication on the mountain.

You are The Climbing Team

You are the climbing team: Alpine Ascents keeps its Base Camp small, and does not use it to support or house self-guided or partially guided teams.

Oxygen

This program utilizes three bottles of oxygen on summit day. High-altitude oxygen systems are used for the summit attempt, during the night at High Camp, and for medical emergencies should the need arise.

Wi-fi

Wi-Fi at Base Camp, satellite phones, and cybercasts: Our team enjoys Wi-Fi internet connectivity while at Base Camp, allowing our climbers to bring their own personal electronic devices. We also have satellite telephones during the entire climb. This provides direct emergency contact with home, and is our regular link to the Alpine Ascents office. This depth of contact can only be had with a well-established, long-term guiding company.

Administrative Staff

Our tight-knit staff is always available to answer questions and address concerns. It is not uncommon for family members to contact us during the climb for information. There is always someone available (on a cell phone during non-office hours) to handle lost luggage, make arrangements if flights are missed or delayed, relay messages directly to the team, or mitigate any of the numerous situations that may arise before, during, and after the climb.

Tibet entry

We are aware of the delicate visa process for entering the area.

Additional Services

We also offer an extra oxygen and Sherpa support package.

This was my first true expedition, other trips have been climbs but this was the first where we spend a lot of time traveling and acclimatizing on the mountain vs. just climbing (like Denali). Very good leaders and strong leaders (well respected). They did an excellent job of passing on knowledge. Presented their ideas and […]

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