Logistics

8:00 A.M. Gear Check Day 1 of the Course

Meet at the Mazama Store outside in the courtyard.  The Mazama Store is located in Mazama, Washington.  We will do a mandatory gear check beginning at 8a.m. on the day your course is scheduled to begin. This gear check will last about 1 hour. You are required to attend this meeting. Please review the Gear Check information and come prepared.   Please note transportation is not provided on this course.

A valid Northwest Forest Pass is required to park at the trailhead. Annual Passes are available from a variety of local and online vendors, or you can purchase a Day e-Pass online for each day of your trip and print them at home.

In Mazama

We recommend lodging the night before in Mazama or Winthrop Washington.  Please plan accordingly as Mazama is a 4.5hr drive from Seattle.

8:00 a.m. Gear Check (First Day of Course)

Meet at the Mazama Store near Washington Pass at 8am for a mandatory gear check. This takes place the first day of your course. This meeting will last approximately 1 hour.

You are required to attend this meeting, so we can do a thorough check of your gear, provide packing instruction, check personal menu items, review the route and trip itinerary, and answer any questions you may have.

What to Bring: Please bring all of your gear to gear check. Note that you do not need to pack carefully, as we look at every item together.

Rental gear needs to be picked up in person at the Alpine Ascents Office in Seattle. Make sure you contact the Gear Department to arrange for your rental gear pickup in the days prior to your course. You are responsible to bring all gear on the gear list except what you rent from Alpine Ascents.

Gear Check
Blog: How To Pack Like A Pro

Gear List

Link back to your 4 Day Alpine Rock gear list:

Due to the heavily glaciated temperate mountains in the Washington Cascades you may be subject to highly variable weather conditions. With this in mind, we developed our gear list for the comfort and well being of our climbers. There may be occasions when required items are not used because of current weather conditions. You are welcome to call the office before your trip to check on conditions, but please note the gear list prepares you for poor weather conditions.

You are required to bring every item on this list as described so be as precise as possible when packing. Alpine Ascents rents quality equipment at reasonable rates. Gear is also available for purchase at the Alpine Ascents Equipment Store where climbers on an Alpine Ascents expedition will receive a discount.

Packing for your Course

Oftentimes when packing for a trip it’s easy for the extras to pile up and weight to quickly build.

Read our blog post on How to Downsize your Pack to help with those critical item considerations for your upcoming course!

Stoves & Tents

For this 4 Day Alpine Rock course, we will be packing in everything we need for four days, including food. You also need to have your own tent and stove, unless you are renting from Alpine Ascents International. The tent, stove, and cooking utensils, while required for your course, can be shared between two climbers to reduce pack weight. Pairing climbers prior to the course is difficult; we have found it best to do pairings at the gear check the morning of your course. Please be aware of this possibility to share these items.

Menu Planning

Food Shopping

For this course, you will be responsible for bringing and cooking your own food, including lunches. Please purchase your foods before we meet. There are several large supermarkets near our office including Trader Joe’s, Safeway, and Metropolitan Market. If you plan to incorporate freeze-dried meals, purchase these ahead of time.

A comprehensive menu planning guide can be found on the next tab on this page: Menu Plan

Overview

Food is one of the basic pleasures of wilderness travel. There are countless options for putting together healthy and delicious meals for long wilderness trips, depending on how much time, effort, and money you have to spend on preparation before the trip. Thorough meal planning and preparation is a must!

While our summit climbs and expeditions include meals, our mountaineering courses aim to teach sustainability and self-sufficiency in the mountains. Guides will review all food items at the gear check, but you will be responsible for cooking your own meals.

Due to the nature of this course, and the fact that we are car camping, we have the luxury of bringing heavier and fresher foods. Furthermore, the  proximity to civilization allows for at least one stop at a grocery for resupply. The 4 days of the course will be spent in campsites where it’s a short  drive to town to eat at restaurants and purchase food at grocery stores. Meals during this portion of the course are generally very simple versions of what you cook at home. It will be easy to pick up the food you need during the course.

For the Alpine Rock Climbing Course you will need:
3 Breakfasts
4 Lunches
3 Dinners

Basic Principles

Nourishment and mountaineering are inseparable. Climbing requires higher daily energy expenditure than many other strenuous activities. Eating well (and frequently!) sustains energy levels, keeps us happy, and helps us to combat the cold conditions and inclement weather we will likely encounter in the mountains of Washington. One of the most challenging parts of a mountain guide’s job is advising climbers on the types and quantities of food to bring on a mountaineering expedition. Unlike items such a sleeping bag where you have it packed or not, food is subjective.

Some climbers eat large quantities of food, some eat less. Some love dehydrated meals, while others do not as a result of digestion issues. As guides, we can’t tell you what you are going to like or how much you are going to eat. There is no way to tell you if you’re going to want 2,500 or 3,500 calories per day.

With that in mind, here are some general thoughts on food planning:

Too little food is terrible, but too much food is not the answer
Going hungry and/or having to live off the extra food of other climbers and guides is not fun. On the other hand, you don’t want to haul around food that will go uneaten. Consider the weight and volume of what foods you are bringing.

All food selection is a compromise between taste, weight, space
A block of cheese is easier to pack than a similar amount weight of shredded cheese because it is denser. Dehydrated meals are the lightest meals to pack and easiest to prepare, but if you don’t like them it doesn’t matter how light and easy they are.

Bring food that you like
Five days is a long time to be unhappy with your food choices. If you don’t like a particular food in your home, it is unlikely you are going to start enjoying it in the mountains.

It’s your responsibility to check food preferences and amounts prior to your trip
Is 1 cup dry cereal with 3 tablespoons of powdered milk enough for one breakfast, or will you be happier with 1.5 cups? How much pasta should you bring for one dinner – 1 packet or 2? Trying out a few mountain meals at home will give you a much better sense of what to bring. Test out snack/lunch options before your course, too.

Condiments
Salt, pepper, mustard, hot sauce, sugar, etc. are all great additions to any meal plan, especially if you are not using dehydrated meals (as they are already high in sodium). The lightest option is to pick up individual serving packets from the deli section at the grocery and store them in a Ziploc bag. Also, very, very small (1 oz.) plastic storage containers with screw-on caps can be purchased at most outdoor stores for condiment storage.

Hot Drinks
An essential part of breakfast and dinner for both hydration and well being. Coffee drinkers take heart – there can be decent coffee in the mountains! Starbucks VIA’s have become standard on mountaineering expeditions. A small portion of powdered milk and sugar can be added. Black tea, yerba mate, herbal teas, hot chocolate, and powdered chai are other options. Plan on bringing enough for 2 to 5 hot drinks per day!

Food Storage
Meats and cheeses are great foods for this course as they will not spoil – nature’s freezer (snow!) will be close to hand. Reduce excess packaging. Get rid of boxes, extra wrapping, etc. Ziplocks are great for repackaging food. A few medium-sized stuff sacks are great for organizing food while in camp.

Drinking Water
Consider bringing Nuun hydration tablets or other cold drink mixes to add to drinking water for electrolyte replacement during your course. *Please note the emphasis on hot drinks and other liquids in the menu. Staying hydrated while climbing is very important, and this issue is addressed in-depth while on the course.

On the Mountain

All Nights of Climb

Sleeping arrangements: Tents
Bathroom: Go Anywhere Waste Kits (pack it out).
Cell coverage: Sporadic service with various providers. Clear days offer better cellular reception.

Leave No Trace

Alpine Ascents International practices Leave No Trace principles on all expeditions. We believe that given the proper information most people will do all they can to help protect and maintain the environment. Before your climb, please become familiar with Leave No Trace:

7 Principles of Leave No Trace

As guides, we spend time teaching the environmentally appropriate Leave No Trace principles and practices. There is nothing more rewarding than working hard to get high into the mountains, reaching a pristine campsite, witnessing incredible views, and having the feeling that no one has been there before.

Conversely, there is nothing more disheartening than working hard to climb a mountain, reaching a site and encountering trash, food waste, and toilet paper. Please read the seven LNT principles, and call the office if you have any questions about what you can do to plan ahead.

Tipping

Guides are permitted to accept and greatly appreciate tips. Your guide team is composed of two guides. They will pool all tips received. An average tip for the full guide team is $165 – 250.

Please be aware that we are unable to process tips by card. You are welcome to tip your guides with cash or via mobile payment such as Venmo or PayPal.

I LOVED the course and will carry the experience I had with me the rest of my life. The quality of the instruction, the location, the routes selected by the guides, the campsite, etc were all beyond any reasonable expectations I had going into the trip. I absolutely feel ready to use the skills I […]

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